Joplin Spooklights

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Xpedition TV Investigates

12:41 minutes

Spook-LightsThe Joplin Spook Lights have held a facination for Jerry and Kathy Wills for many years. During September 2007, continuing their 28,000 mile journey across America, they decided to investigate. The experience was extraordinary.

"As we waited and watched, things really began to get strange.... What you are about to see are the actual events as they occurred."


Information

tristatemapThe Joplin Spook Lights are usually described as a single orange ball of light varying in size between a baseball and a basketball , though it has been described as being different sizes, colors, shapes, and in some cases as being several individual balls of light.

The best time to view the light is between 10pm and 3am. The mysterious light travels from west to east along a dirt road called Devil's Promenade and seems to bob and bounce along the road. It has been known to enter cars, though in most cases it is said to shy away from people, large groups and loud sounds.

The light is also called Hornet Spook Light, Neosha Spook Light, Devils Jack - O - Lantern, Hornet Ghost Light, Tri-state Spook-light, etc. One legend suggests the phenomena are the spirits of a Quapaw Indian couple joined in death because they could not be together in life. Another legend suggests it is the ghost of a miner who came up missing after he left to search of his family who had been kidnapped by Indians.

Our theory is a bit different, having been conceived from our exploration of unusual places in north and south America. We believe the light might be caused by the activation of a portal similar to those we have discovered at various remote locations. These portals were used to move between planetary locations here and elsewhere. In simplistic terms, a wormhole allowing instant passage once activated.
From our research we know the device is usually constructed from sedimentary stone (sandstone) with unique crystalline arrangement and properties, draws upon planetary and/ or cosmic energy. In every instance these are activated with sound.

The Joplin Spook Lights are one of, if not the most well known unexplained paranormal mystery in Missouri and the world. It has been witnessed regularly since first sighted by local residents in 1866. People have traveled from around the world to catch a glimpse of the phenomenon.

Many in the paranormal and scientific fields have studied the Spook Lights and tried to explain it, including the Army Corps of Engineers. There are many theories but none have a conclusive answer as to what it is or why it appears.

Some of these theories suggest the light is caused by escaping natural gas and another says that it could be caused by reflections from the hwy.

During our investigation we found no trace of escaping methane gas after entering the area where the light was seen, unlike another area in south eastern Texas (the Saratoga Lights) we have researched. During our investigation we checked the reflective surfaces you can (at times) see in this video. There is no connection between the "Spook Lights" and these reflectors. From our experience, neither of these theories seem plausible. Most of the local residents and many investigators believe these explanations do not account for what they have witnessed.

For example, if the light is caused by escaping gas why do many witnesses describe the light as seeming to have a form of intelligence (which we have seen evidence of). And, if the light is caused by reflected car lights then how do you explain the fact that it's first sighting was in 1866 or that it moved into a highway patrolman's vehicle one night.

We intend to return to this area soon. If you're interested, and are available to travel, we invite you to join us. To stay informed you should join the Jerry Wills/ Xpeditions TV newsletter.

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